Vancouver British Columbia Temple Wiki

Description

The Vancouver British Columbia Temple is a temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Langley, British Columbia.

History

Hope

In 1997, Church President Gordon B. Hinckley announced the Church would start building smaller temples so more temples could be built throughout the world. This allowed the members of the Church in Vancouver to hope that a temple would be built in their area. To prepare for a possible temple, stake leaders in the area encouraged the members to keep the promises made in the temple and to go there more often.

Closed Borders

Members of The Church traveled to the Seattle Washington Temple, but that changed after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, in the United States. Traveling across the nation’s border to Seattle became more difficult. Many were not able to cross the border to attend the temple at all.

Site Selection

The Church asked a stake leader in the area, President Paul D.M. Christensen, president of the Abbotsford British Columbia Stake, to be involved with planning for the temple. After he and other leaders scoured the area and selected possible temple sites, President Hinckley arrived to examine the options in 2005. He willingly looked at all the sites, and during their tour, he noticed an area with a hedge of trees. He declared, “That would be a nice place to build a temple.”

After returning to Salt Lake City, President Hinckley requested that Christensen research that spot. Christensen went to take pictures and said, “When I walked past the hedge I then saw what the Prophet had perceived. It was a beautiful site at the peak of the largest hill in the area, the highest elevation in the Township.[1]Al Irwin, “Place of Peace,” Langley Times 9 Aug. 2006, 9 Aug. 2006 .

It had trees all around it and was nestled in a lovely setting. It felt like the right place.”[2]Sarah Broom Delong with Dennis A. Wright, Vancouver Saints: A Brief History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Vancouver and the Lower Mainland of British Columbia: 1845 to 2007 (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University: 2009), 95.

Unfortunately, the land was not for sale, the 11-acre parcel was composed of three smaller parcels—none of which were for sale and one which had recently sold—but the Church eventually acquired each one.

Announcement

The official announcement for plans to build a temple in Vancouver came on 25 May 2006. The First Presidency sent official letters to leaders in the area declaring, “We are confident that this will be a blessing to the many faithful Saints in this and surrounding areas that have had to travel long distances to enjoy the blessings of a temple. … We commend the Saints for their devotion and faithfulness and are thankful for the blessings that will come to them through the construction of this new temple.”[3]2 Delong with Wright, Vancouver Saints, 91.

When Gerald and Linda McLean of the Calgary Alberta Foothills Stake received the news, they were astonished to discover that one of the parcels the Church had purchased for the temple was their former residence of four years where they had reared two children and given birth to two more before relocating to Alberta. They later learned that the temple itself would stand on their old property. In answer to a letter sent to President Monson’s office, the entire McLean family received tickets to the temple dedication.[4]Nick Newman, “Canadian Mormons’ home site becomes Vancouver Temple,” MormonTimes 1 May 2010, 1 May 2010 .

A public hearing was held June 18, 2007, at Township Hall to get public feedback on the proposed temple, meetinghouse, and residence, as detailed in the rezoning application. Public concern focused on increased traffic, height of the spire, nightly floodlighting, and environmental impact. Other participants helped allay these concerns by explaining that patron visits are spread throughout the day, minimizing traffic impact, and that sophisticated directional floodlighting prevents over-spill onto adjoining land. The temple grounds were described as a neighborhood asset, which feature walkways among gorgeous landscaping—open to the public for daytime or evening strolls.[5]Kristyl Clark, “Willoughby temple’s lights cause concern,” Langley Times 20 Jun. 2007, 25 Jun. 2007 .

Groundbreaking

Elder Ronald S. Rasband, then of the Presidency of the Seventy, presided at the groundbreaking ceremony for the Vancouver British Columbia Temple on Saturday, August 4, 2007. Beautiful weather and heavenly music accompanied the event—the music being provided by a choir of members from the Lower Mainland. President Christensen addressed the congregation, telling the remarkable story of the temple site’s selection and acquisition. Numerous priesthood and civic leaders participated in the ceremonial shoveling, marking the formal commencement of construction.[6]Anthony and Carol Middleton, “Vancouver Temple Ground Breaking!” Vancouver Star 7 Aug. 2007, 11 Aug. 2007 .

Open House

In December, 2009, The First Presidency of the Church announced dates for a public open house prior to the dedication of the new Vancouver British Columbia Temple. The public would be invited to visit the temple during an open house that would run from Friday, 9 April 2010, through Saturday, 24 April 2010 (except for Sundays).

Cultural Celebration

The Latter-day Saints’ growing excitement and desire to serve was expressed on1  May 2010, when more than 1,200 youth from the temple district performed in a cultural celebration. Since the temple district includes all of British Columbia as well as northern Washington, some of the participants had to travel several hours to participate. The celebration was called “Beacon to the World.” The performance included dancing as well as a tribute to the pioneer heritage of the area.

Dedication

On 2 May 2010, Church President Thomas S. Monson dedicated the Vancouver British Columbia Temple in three sessions.[7]News Story“, Newsroom, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints , December 5, 2009, retrieved 2012-10-15

In his dedicatory prayer, President Monson expressed the importance of contributing to and serving others: “Bless Thy children throughout the world who know hunger, who have no shelter, and who face daily suffering. May we reach out to them in a spirit of love and true charity.”[8]Vancouver British Columbia dedicatory prayer, in Church News, May 8, 2010,

Formal temple work commenced on Monday, 3 May 2010.

Dedicatory Prayer

Dedication Order

It is the seventh temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Canada and the 131st operating temple of the Church in the world.

Presidents

Temple PresidentYears Served
Collin J. Van Horne[9]New Temple Presidents Called to Serve in Mexico, Manti, Fiji, and Canada,” Church News, LDS.org, 1 June 2018. Accessed 6 October 20182018–
Thomas E. Walker2015–2018
Ronald W. Komm2012–2015
Cordell B. Rolfson2010–2012

Location

Located on an elevated site near the Trans-Canada Highway, just north of picturesque Langley on the east side of Metro Vancouver, the Vancouver British Columbia Temple tall and rectangular amidst  landscape of trees and flowers. The temple is located on a an 11.6-acre site at 200 Street and 82 Avenue in the suburb of Langley. Sharing the site are the Langley meetinghouse, which houses Distribution Services, and the temple president’s residence. The south end of the property features a grassy and beautifully wooded retreat t

Exterior

Cladding

The exterior of the temple is clad in Siena granite from Brazil

Windows

Symbolism

Inscriptions

Cornerstone

Spires and Moroni

Spire

On March 10, 2009, to a crowd of about 200 onlookers, the steeple of the 140 foot spire was lifted into place, followed by placement of the gold-leafed angel Moroni statue.

Moroni

Sculptor  
Version  
Placed  
Faces  
Height
Feet 
Meters  

Interior

The Vancouver British Columbia Temple is 28,165 square feet. The interior contains hardwood from Africa’s western coast and murals displaying beautiful British Columbian landscapes. The Pacific dogwood, British Columbia’s official flower, was also used in the interior design. Rooms in the temple include a baptistry; two instruction rooms; a celestial room, which symbolizes eternal life with God; and two sealing rooms, where marriages are performed.

Individuals and Contractors

Architect  Abbarch Architecture Inc
ContractorDominion Fairmile Construction
Project ManagerAlan Rudolf

Sources and Links

Additional Articles

Sources/Citation

References   [ + ]

1. Al Irwin, “Place of Peace,” Langley Times 9 Aug. 2006, 9 Aug. 2006 .
2. Sarah Broom Delong with Dennis A. Wright, Vancouver Saints: A Brief History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Vancouver and the Lower Mainland of British Columbia: 1845 to 2007 (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University: 2009), 95.
3. 2 Delong with Wright, Vancouver Saints, 91.
4. Nick Newman, “Canadian Mormons’ home site becomes Vancouver Temple,” MormonTimes 1 May 2010, 1 May 2010 .
5. Kristyl Clark, “Willoughby temple’s lights cause concern,” Langley Times 20 Jun. 2007, 25 Jun. 2007 .
6. Anthony and Carol Middleton, “Vancouver Temple Ground Breaking!” Vancouver Star 7 Aug. 2007, 11 Aug. 2007 .
7. News Story“, Newsroom, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints , December 5, 2009, retrieved 2012-10-15
8. Vancouver British Columbia dedicatory prayer, in Church News, May 8, 2010,
9. New Temple Presidents Called to Serve in Mexico, Manti, Fiji, and Canada,” Church News, LDS.org, 1 June 2018. Accessed 6 October 2018

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *